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What you can do with an Agronomy degree

Two people wearing coats and gloves undertaking tests on plants in a greenhouse
As the global population continues to grow and the need for sustainable food production becomes more pressing, agronomy is becoming increasingly important.

Agronomy is the science of using plants for food, fuel, and other products. The field of study of Agronomy focuses on how to grow and manage crops effectively, as well as how to improve soil health and use water and other resources efficiently.

Agronomists also study how to protect crops from pests and diseases. In simple terms, agronomy is the study of how to grow crops and make the most of the resources available to farmers.

If you're considering a career in agronomy, or are just curious about what an agronomy degree can do for you, here are some of the key things you should know.

What is Agronomy?

Agronomy is an interdisciplinary field of study that encompasses a wide range of topics related to crop production and soil management. This focuses on understanding how plants grow and how they interact with the environment around them, including how they respond to different weather conditions, soil types, and other factors that affect crop growth and productivity.

Agronomists also study the environmental and economic factors that influence agriculture, such as climate change, water availability, and innovative farm practices. They use this knowledge to help farmers and other agricultural professionals boost crop yields and improve the health of their soils.

What can you do with an Agronomy degree?

The career opportunities available to agronomy graduates are diverse and varied.

Agronomists can work in a wide range of settings, including government agencies, private industry, research institutions, and non-profit organisations. Agronomists can also take on roles in research and fieldwork, teaching and education, or in policy and advocacy.

Some common job titles for agronomists include plant and soil scientists, crop advisors, agricultural research scientists, extension agents, and so on.

Agronomists in research and fieldwork

Agronomists who often work in scientific research and fieldwork mainly focus on helping to improve crop yields and soil health. They conduct experiments to test new crop varieties, growing techniques, and soil management strategies. They might also study the effects of climate change on crops, or investigate ways to reduce the use of chemical pesticides and fertilisers. This could help farmers in growing crops profitably and creating more sustainable farming operations.

Agronomists in education and extension

Agronomists in this field teach farmers, students, and others about the best practices for crop production and soil management.

They may work as extension agents, meaning they visit farmers in the field to provide advice and technical assistance. They usually have a deep knowledge of agronomy, which helps to educate and inform people so they are able to develop innovative farm practices.

Agronomists in policy and advocacy

Agronomists may also work in policy and advocacy, where they work to improve agricultural policies, regulations, and laws. They may participate in the development of new regulations, or work to advocate for policies that support sustainable farming practices.

By working in this field, agronomists can help to shape the future of agriculture and promote
environmentally friendly farming practices.

Ready to get started on your career in Agronomy?

As the global population continues to grow and the need for sustainable food production becomes more pressing, agronomy is becoming increasingly important.

An agronomy degree will give you the current knowledge and industry-standard skills that are needed to develop, promote, and improve the productivity and sustainability of agricultural practices. 

Melbourne Polytechnic's Agriculture and Conservation courses offer a broad range of qualifications in the fields of Conservation, Agronomy and Viticulture and Winemaking.

Agriculture and Conservation

If you’re interested in climate change, farming, sustainability, and winemaking, look no further than Agriculture and Conservation.

Undergraduate Certificate in Viticulture and Winemaking
Agriculture and Conservation - Part Time - Epping
Agriculture and Conservation - Part Time - Epping
The Undergraduate Certificate in Viticulture and Winemaking is your introduction into the winemaking industry.
Bachelor of Agriculture and Technology - Viticulture and Winemaking
Agriculture and Conservation - Full Time, Part Time - Epping
VTAC Agriculture and Conservation - Full Time, Part Time - Epping
Our Bachelor of Agriculture and Technology majoring in Viticulture and Winemaking will give you a leading edge in the competitive Australian wine industry.
Undergraduate Certificate in Agriculture
Agriculture and Conservation - Full Time - Epping
Agriculture and Conservation - Full Time - Epping
The Undergraduate Certificate in Agriculture is a 6-month program developed to get you career-ready for the agriculture industry.
Bachelor of Agriculture and Technology - Sports Turf Science and Management
Agriculture and Conservation, Horticulture - Full Time, Part Time - Epping, Fairfield
Agriculture and Conservation, Horticulture - Full Time, Part Time - Epping, Fairfield
Melbourne Polytechnic's unique Bachelor of Agriculture and Technology (Sports Turf Science and Management) is the only higher education offering in this field in Australia, backed by the ASTMA.
Bachelor of Agriculture and Technology - Agronomy
Agriculture and Conservation - Full Time, Part Time - Epping
VTAC Agriculture and Conservation - Full Time, Part Time - Epping
Agronomy is the study of management in crops and pastures with a focus on sustainability and agricultural production. The world’s agriculture industry faces many challenges in the future with climate change, a growing world population, new technologies and changing resource conditions.