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Bachelor of Applied Architecture

VTAC Code: HEBAA CRICOS: 081679D VTAC Number: Epping 6900221522

Overview

Campus

Epping

Campus

Epping

Duration

3 years full time / 6 years part time

Duration

3 years

Next Intake

February, July

Next Intake

February, July

Undergraduate degree in Architecture

The Bachelor of Applied Architecture has been designed to deliver the essential skills required by students of architecture at undergraduate level.

Studying the Bachelor of Applied Architecture, you will gain design and technical skills as well as a foundational knowledge base relating to the practice of architecture.

You will learn a range of architectural software and will learn to create innovative design solutions that respond to client briefs, the principles of environmental sustainability and to the natural and built environments.

Career Pathways

Where will this take me

Graduates of the Bachelor of Applied Architecture may work for architects, building designers and interior designers and related professions.

To qualify as an architect graduates must also complete a masters of Architecture degree as well as meet the requirements of the state architects registration board.

  • Building Design Draftsperson
  • Building Design Assistant
  • Architect Assistant
  • Building Planner
  • Architectural Technician
  • Building Designer
  • Architect (on completion of Master of Architecture)

Pathways

On successful completion of the Bachelor of Applied Architecture you may be eligible for entry into postgraduate Master of Architecture study at other institutions.

BBE End of Year Exhibition 2020

A person designing a wooden prototype of a building

This online exhibition show cases the best architectural design work from students of the Bachelor of Built Environment at Melbourne Polytechnic.

Visit the online exhibition

Course Details

Delivery methods

Semester 2 commencement available to applicants with credit. Enquire now to find out more.

Course delivery continues at Melbourne Polytechnic during the challenges of the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation the world is facing right now. Our top priority remains the health, safety and well-being of our community.

This program has responded to the COVID-19 restrictions by modifying its delivery to a blended model supporting remote learning. For the immediate term, we’ve changed the way our students attend class, with all lectures, tutorials and seminars moved online.

A collaborative learning environment is created through the requirement of students to attend synchronous online sessions at the normal class times. These sessions are run through Moodle, our learning management system, and conferencing software (e.g. Zoom or Teams). This includes assessment wherever possible.

Alternative arrangements are being made for activities which must be conducted on-campus.

Class Schedule

Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

Semester 2 commencement available to applicants with credit. Enquire now to find out more.

Assessment Methods

Assessment methods will include a blend of design presentations ('pin-ups' and oral presentations), model making, portfolios, essays, reports, reflective journals, case studies and analyses, projects, tests and exams.

Regular attendance and class participation is a critical part of architectural education.

Units of Study

Credit points are a basic measure of student workload. All subjects are given a credit point value. Most subjects at Melbourne Polytechnic are 12 credit points. A normal full-time annual workload is 96 credit points. The academic year is divided into two main semesters; full-time students usually enrol in 48 credit points each semester, part-time students usually enrol in 24 credit points each semester or less.

Code Subject Elective Description Year Semester
ARC111 Architectural Design 1 Core In this unit students are introduced to the vocabulary of design and architecture and gain an appreciation of the fundamentals of design theory. Students will engage with design philosophy and elements such as site analysis, siting and principles of passive solar design. Students will develop their understanding through hands on activities including esquisses, drawing, sketches, modelling, drafting, digital presentation techniques and site visits. Competencies are demonstrated through freehand drawing, perspective drawing, model making, photography, sculpture and exhibition. The fundamentals of space, form and content will be explored. Principles of problem solving in the design process are explored and applied in practical situations.
ARC121 Architectural Design 2 Core Design studio subjects are taught as part of a vertical structured design studio for all levels of design except first semester first year design, which is taught as a stand-alone subject. Design briefs and projects in each studio vary and allow for engagement in diverse range of building types for students at different levels of design and to be assess at their design level. The projects focus on a specific type of use, construction, planning etc., and are assessed at the appropriate standard for each student’s design level. Each semester a range of studio programs may be available and students will be counselled about the most appropriate program for them. The intention is for design studio to form the core of the students’ studies. The vertical integration of students at different levels in the course will help to create a collaborative and creative learning environment, and is generally to be preferred to studio structured by year level.
ARC211 Architectural Design 3 Core Design studio subjects are taught as part of a vertical structured design studio for all levels of design except first semester first year design, which is taught as a stand-alone subject. Design briefs and projects in each studio vary and allow for engagement in diverse range of building types for students at different levels of design and to be assess at their design level. The projects focus on a specific type of use, construction, planning etc., and are assessed at the appropriate standard for each student’s design level. Each semester a range of studio programs may be available and students will be counselled about the most appropriate program for them. The intention is for design studio to form the core of the students’ studies. The vertical integration of students at different levels in the course will help to create a collaborative and creative learning environment, and is generally to be preferred to studio structured by year level.
ARC221 Architectural Design 4 Core , and integrate internal and external spaces with design of mixed use developments.
ARC311 Architectural Design 5 Core Design studio subjects are taught as part of a vertical structured design studio for all levels of design except first semester first year design, which is taught as a stand-alone subject. Design briefs and projects in each studio vary and allow for engagement in diverse range of building types for students at different levels of design and to be assess at their design level. The projects focus on a specific type of use, construction, planning etc., and are assessed at the appropriate standard for each student’s design level. Each semester a range of studio programs may be available and students will be counselled about the most appropriate program for them. The intention is for design studio to form the core of the students’ studies. The vertical integration of students at different levels in the course will help to create a collaborative and creative learning environment, and is generally to be preferred to studio structured by year level.
ARC321 Architectural Design 6 Core Design studio subjects are taught as part of a vertical structured design studio for all levels of design except first semester first year design, which is taught as a stand-alone subject. Design briefs and projects in each studio vary and allow for engagement in diverse range of building types for students at different levels of design and to be assess at their design level. The projects focus on a specific type of use, construction, planning etc., and are assessed at the appropriate standard for each student’s design level. Each semester a range of studio programs may be available and students will be counselled about the most appropriate program for them. The intention is for design studio to form the core of the students’ studies. The vertical integration of students at different levels in the course will help to create a collaborative and creative learning environment, and is generally to be preferred to studio structured by year level.
ARC112 Architectural Technology 1 Core Students develop an understanding of how elements of the built form come together. Ideas of shelter and properties of materials are developed through research and activity-based exercises .
ARC122 Architectural Technology 2 Core Students encounter principles of service installation, codes and practices and apply this knowledge in the context of the “house”. Domestic construction techniques and knowledge in relation to structural mechanics and material properties are developed.
ARC212 Architectural Technology 3 Core Students investigate the appropriate and relevant construction systems and materials for the various site contexts relating to community living.
ARC222 Architectural Technology 4 Core The documentation process and project management practice are deeply intertwined and students learn to navigate the complexities of these two important elements in the context of mixed use development.
ARC312 Architectural Technology 5 Core Students will learn about wide-span construction systems, the uses of pre-cast and in-situ concrete, alternative building materials and specific services requirements.
ARC113 Architectural Communications 1 Core This subject introduces a range of concepts and skills in the application of digital tools used to communicate design ideas and solutions at the schematic, development and documentation stages of the design process. Students will build on the basic skills on digital communication and design expression introduced in BBE111 Design Principles. This subject reinforces practice based methods to ensure that the client, builder and other relevant stakeholders can clearly understand the scope and intent of the proposed design solution.
ARC123 Architectural Communications 2 Core This subject introduces a range of concepts and skills in the application of digital tools used to communicate design ideas and solutions at the schematic, development and documentation stages of the design process. Students will build on the basic skills on digital communication and design expression introduced in BBE111 Design Principles and BBE 123 Digital Communications Documentation and Practice II. This subject reinforces practice based methods to ensure that the client, builder and other relevant stakeholders can clearly understand the scope and intent of the proposed design solution.
ARC313 Architectural Communications 3 Core This subject introduces students to the business context within which architecture is practiced. Students will be examine the principles of practice structure, communication, professional ethics, presentation, business management and contract administration procedures. The subject will also address the management of the design process in an architectural office.
ARC213 History of Architecture Core This subject introduces students to the history and theory of the built form and space in the context of World Architecture and their influence and impact on Australian and Melbourne Architecture. Students explore the influence of historical forces on architecture through specific buildings and the work of key architects. Students engage with influences such as topography, subdivision, distribution of activities, paths of movement, construction technology and building materials, industry, politics, and religion. Exemplars from a chronological sequence of the significant eras in World architecture are considered in weekly lectures and the historical context explored. Learning activities include lectures, site visits, essays and research report topics, outlines essay and research report writing conventions, reviews previous lecture presentations, and sets site visit requirements. A selection of the Melbourne exemplars will be studied during field trips and site visits.
ARC223 History of Modern Architecture Core History of Modern Architecture explores ideas, movements and key individuals in the development of architecture in the 19th and 20th centuries against the dramatic and unprecedented social, political, scientific and technological changes of the past 2 centuries. In contrast to the chronological approach adopted in ARC 113, the History of Modern Architecture takes a thematic approach to the subject matter. Students are expected to be writing, researching and engaging in the subject matter at a higher level than in ARC 113.
ARC322 Architectural Practice Core This subject further engages students with the professional practice of architecture, focusing on design development within both regulatory and practice management frameworks. Students are introduced to the fundamental principles of key regulatory requirements and deploy their understanding by investigating local practice case studies. They further develop a capacity to apply their knowledge in a particular context through an architectural design project that they document to Planning Application level using best practice.
ARC323 Architecture and Urbanism Core This subject introduces students to the history and theory of urban design and planning and focuses on how these relate to the development of contemporary urban environments. You will explore the influence of historical and other forces on the growth of towns and cities, with a particular focus on Melbourne and its development as a metropolis since its’ founding in 1835. Students will engage in both the visual and narrative methods to develop a heightened awareness of emerging issues of urban growth and change.
My teachers are dedicated and very supportive and it has given me opportunities to make new friends. These experiences have made me feel happy and comfortable and as an international student this is very important.
Eric Law
Architecture Degree
Portrait of student Eric Law

Fees & Costs

Per year $16880
Per semester $8440
Per year $20200
Per semester $10100

When you are studying higher education courses you may qualify for FEE-HELP payments for part or all of your tuition fees. FEE-HELP loans do not cover materials costs.

Find out more information about FEE-HELP.

Fees displayed are effective for new applications received on or after 1 November 2021. Tuition fees do not include textbooks, course materials or overseas student health insurance and visa fees.

After initial deposit, international students are able to pay tuition fees in installments, four times per year.

For more detailed information please read the International Student Fees.

Fees explained

The fees for those ineligible for a government-funded enrolment. 

Check your eligibility here.

The cost of tuition for those eligible for government funding.

Check your eligibility here.

Additional expenses

The Student Services and Amenities Fee is charged at forty cents (40 cents) per student contact hour and is capped over a twelve (12) month period, effective from the enrolment date, to:

  • $250 for full fee-paying students; and
  • $175 for concession-paying students studying Certificate I, II, III, or IV.

Amenities fees are used to improve non-academic services including libraries, counselling services, student support, and recreational activities.

When you are studying higher education courses you may qualify for FEE-HELP payments for part or all of your tuition fees. FEE-HELP loans do not cover materials costs.

Find out more information about FEE-HELP.

Requirements

Year 12 (or equivalent)

  • Minimum score of 20 in any English VCE Units 3 and 4 subjects or equivalent.
  • Minimum score of 20 in any Maths.
  • Selection interview.

VCAL Students:

  • Selection interview
  • Folio of work

Semester 2 commencement available to applicants with credit. Enquire now to find out more.

Academic: Australian Year 12 equivalency
English: Academic IELTS 6.5 with no individual band below 6.0 or equivalent as outlined in Melbourne Polytechnic's English Proficiency Policy. Pearson PTE Academic 58 overall with no individual communicative skill below 50, or Melbourne Polytechnic recognised equivalency.
Other: you must submit a folio of work. If you are shortlisted, you will be required to attend an interview

Next Steps

Melbourne Polytechnic is committed to providing transparency to the admissions process. In line with this commitment, we provide you with information that will help in making informed choices about your future studies.

Find out more about Melbourne Polytechnic’s commitment to admissions transparency.

Applicants for this course will need to have met the academic requirements. Meeting the minimum admission criteria does not guarantee entry into this course. Past academic performance may be considered.

You may also be required to attend an interview to discuss your career plans, aptitude and understanding of your chosen course of study and the requirements of tertiary study. (This may be conducted face-to-face or by through a video conference call using Skype or other application).

During your interview, you may be asked to provide:

  • Your CV outlining your relevant work and life skills and experience
  • Any letters of reference from employers
  • Documents relating to prior study including course transcripts and subject outlines from other Higher Education Providers if you wish to apply for credit
  • Your portfolio of work

Applicants may be required to attend an interview. Details will be provided by telephone or mail to applicants selected to attend an interview.

When we receive your application, the International Office will be in contact with you shortly to discuss your application and provide you additional instructions.

If you'd like to speak to one of our International Office staff directly, call 1300 635 276

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Local student means; you are an Australian citizen or permanent resident, a New Zealand citizen or a permanent humanitarian visa holder.